GUITAR ARPEGGIO ENCYCLOPEDIA ANDY MARTIN TABLATURE LIBRO SPARTITI CHITARRA PENTAGRAMMA

GUITAR ARPEGGIO ENCYCLOPEDIA, Andy Martin. TABLATURE

Product Description:
Throughout this book you will be exposed to many different types of arpeggios, their families, a horde of fingerings, how to use them and much more. With practice and patience you will be able to have total control on the fingerboard and you will be able to execute arpeggios with fire and finesse like the best players do. By understanding arpeggios it will immensely improve your improvising for song writing and soloing as well as creating majestic melodies and hooks. All of the material is presented in notation and tablature. Throughout my book you will be exposed to many different types of arpeggios, their families, a horde of fingerings, how to use them and much more. First, I would like to define what an arpeggio is in the simplest form. An arpeggio is simply chord tones played seoarately. For instance, if you played an A minor barre chord at the 5th fret with the root note on the sixth string and instead of strumming the chord, try muting the string slightly with your picking hand (rest your picking hand slightly on the bridge of the guitar). Then, pick each note separately and use all down strokes as you ascend and all up strokes as you descend. This is one of the simplest ways to play an arpeggio. You can do this to all the chords you know and you also can experiment with muting the strings or letting the strings ring out as you play them. Arpeggios are also considered as tonal centers. A tonal center tells you what family you belong to and is the center of tonality. For exempIe:

If you take a major scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 the tonal center is the 1-3-5-7 and it is colored with 2-4-6.

If you look at a G major scale the notes diatonically are G-A-B-C-D-E-F#. G is the first degree, A is the second degree, B is the third degree, C is the forth degree, D is the fifth degree and so on.

The tonal center in a G major seventh arpeggio is G B D F#. You can play these notes in any order but traditionally they are played in succession with each other 1-3-5-7.

You should also look at arpeggios as the outline of a scale or chord and you can add your colors to enhance them with flavor. The best analogy I can provide you with is to think of an artist with his pallet. He starts his painting or drawing with an outline, our arpeggio and then he puts a splash of red, green, blue, etc, to make his painting more vibrant. We take our outline, the arpeggio and enhance it with our colors, modal degrees, the 2, 4, 6, 9, 11, 13 or altered colors, sharps or flats. This way we can paint a picture with audibles instead of visuals, then we compose a picture, a story with harmonic content. In my book you will learn how to learn and obtain total control of executing arpeggios and why it is important to have a strong bakground in them. By understanding arpeggios it will immensely improve your improvising for song writing and soloing as well as creating majestic melodies and hooks. Arpeggios are very vocal and lyrical so you can create melodic melody lines or use arpeggios with blistering sweeping speed, incorporating them into you solos, compositions or even as pick up lines. A pick up line is a part of a composition that is played in the present and targets the future. For example, if the solo was about to be approached in your composition, you can playa lick, run, or an arpeggio in the measure before the solo starts to enhance or build up to the solo . Many great guitarists use arpeggios in their compositions and in their soloing. With a lot of practice and patience you will be able to have total control on the fingerboard and you will be able to executed arpeggios with fire and finesse like the best players do. You should also listen to all styles of music even if some styles don't appeal to your ears. Just because you don't like a style of music, it does not mean that you won't learn something from just listening to it. Being musicians and learning our language is what makes a difference in players. We must educate our minds and ears to their fullest extremes. Here are some of my favorite guitarists and composers and their works that exhibit their Arpeggio playing techniques.
Steve Vai: Flexible, Eat Em and Smile, Skyscraper, Passion and Warfare, Alien Love Secrets, Fire Garden, Ultra Zone
Frank Gambale Thunder From Down Under, Passages, Noteworker
Shawn Lane Power of Ten, Tritone Fascination (I love this record)
Yngwie Malmsteen Trilogy, Marching Out, Fire and Ice, Facing the Animal. (When I first started to play, I was studying classical guitar and I heard some of Yngwie's work. I was attracted to the way Yngwie exhibited total control of his exotic 
arpeggios and was a major influence in my passion.)
Paul Gilbert Street Lethal, King of Clubs (Paul has an amazing picking technique that was showcased with Racer X)
Johann Sebastian Bach Goldberg Variations, Trio Sonatas, Piano Sonatas, Toccata and Fugue in D minor, Partita NO.2 in D 
minor, Suite for Lute in E Major, (too many to list!)
Ludwig Van Beethoven Fur Elise, Piano Sonatas Nos. I, 2 & 3, Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 5 "Emperor"


Contents:
1) Acknowledgements
2) Introduction
3) How to Approach This Book
4) Arpeggios Fingerings
5) Arpeggios Families & Interval Formulas
Major Arpeggios
Minor Arpeggios
Diminished
Major 7th
Dominant 7th
Minor 7th
Minor 7th 5
Diminished 7th
Augmented
Major add 9
Minor add 9
Major 6th
Minor 6th
Major sus 4
Minor sus 4
Major 9th
Dominant 9th
Minor 9th
Dominant #9th
Major 7th add #11
Dominant 11th
Minor 11th
Major 13th
Dominant 13th
Minor 13th
Minor/Major 7th
Minor/Major 9th

6) Picking Techniques
7) Superimposing Arpeggios
8) Harmonizing Arpeggios
9) Parallel Harmonies
10) Modal/Diatonic Harmonies
11) Very Violent Riffs and Licks!

Price: €31,99
€31,99
SKU: 401
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240